The House I Live In

THE HOUSE I LIVE IN 

Special screening and panel discussion

with director Eugene Jarecki

6.15pm, Tuesday 13 November – Curzon Soho, London, W1D 5DY

The screening will be followed by a Q&A with Eugene Jarecki, Professor David Nutt, Edwina Grosvenor and Lionel Shriver.

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House I Live In: America's War On Drugs

For over forty years, America’s “War on Drugs” has accounted for 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs in America are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever before. Filmed in more than twenty U.S. states,

THE HOUSE I LIVE IN captures heart-wrenching stories at all levels of America’s drug war – from the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge. Together, these stories pose urgent questions: What caused the war? What perpetuates it? And what can be done to stop it?

http://thehouseilivein.co.uk/

Twitter @DrugWarMovie

Black individuals comprise 13% of the US population and 14% of drug users, yet they are 37% of the  people arrested for drug offenses and 56% of those incarcerated for drug crimes.
As America remains embroiled in conflict overseas, a less visible war is taking place at home, costing countless lives, destroying families, and inflicting untold damage on future generations of Americans.

Over forty years, the War on Drugs has accounted for more than 45 million arrests, made America the world’s largest jailer, and damaged poor communities at home and abroad. Yet for all that, drugs are cheaper, purer, and more available today than ever before.

Filmed in more than twenty states, THE HOUSE I LIVE IN captures heart-wrenching stories from individuals at all levels of America’s War on Drugs. From the dealer to the grieving mother, the narcotics officer to the senator, the inmate to the federal judge, the film offers a penetrating look inside America’s longest war, offering a definitive portrait and revealing its profound human rights implications.

While recognising the seriousness of drug abuse as a matter of public health, the film investigates the tragic errors and shortcomings that have meant it is more often treated as a matter for law enforcement, creating a vast machine that feeds largely on America’s poor, and especially on minority communities. Beyond simple misguided policy, the film examines how political and economic corruption have fueled the war for forty years, despite persistent evidence of its moral, economic, and practical failures.

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0 Comments

  1. The big question behind this is how do we make politicians and civil servants accountable ? If you were responsible for safety of customers/the public in a business (big or small) and you had practices that inflicted injury or death it would lead to prison or you would certainly loose your job. Politicians can make all sorts of ‘mistakes’ and they don’t even have to admit to them let alone suffer any personal consequences. Look at the mess Gordon Brown made with our banking and tax systems as chancellor then PM and he now lives a comfortable life and has not even been investigated for the things he did.
    Most of us would be happy with change but many people who’s complicity with the drug war nonsense has inflicted suffering will get off without so much as a ‘sorry’. We will probably even celebrate them for their change of heart. On the other side do we release people who are serving prison sentences for things that are no longer crimes ? (when/if our laws change). Decades of injustice will take alot of sorting out and maybe alot of forgiving as well.

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